Boticelli Tunic

There she goes!

 small boticelli 2

I’m happy with the result, but please, no more fingering weight tunics for a long time.

I’ve documented our long journey together since January: my desire for a striking, lightweight woolen dress; shaping and design elements.

At our journey’s end, a quick summary: tunic length dress; inseam pockets edged with herringbone stitch and i-cord; wide, square neck edged with i-cord; herringbone stitch collar, shaped around the neck with short rows; sleeves picked up from the armscyes and knitted down, ending with a strip of herringbone stitch bordered with welts (to mimic i-cords in horizontal knitting).

There are lots of polished touches I love about this: the i-cord borders, the way the skirt shaping automatically forces the pocket edges to swing out diagonally, the faux seams along the sides.

small boticelli 3

I love the yarn and colour as well, and can’t imagine anything so sacrilegious as using Malabrigo Sock to actually make socks! It is soft and strong, but has an unexpected matt denseness. On the body it feels woolly, but also velvety. Slightly more variegation than I liked, but I can live with that!

Now for the Earth to swing back around the sun, so I can actually wear it!

Details
Pattern: my own, generated with CustomFit; the border pattern is from Herringbone Socks.
Yarn: Malabrigo sock; 100% wool; 402m (440 yds) = 100gm; light fingering weight; 4 skeins in “Boticelli Red”. Just scraps remained at the end.
Needles: 3.0 mm circulars for everything.

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4 Comments

  1. This is beautiful. I know what you mean about endless knitting with fingering weight yarn! But I love fingering weight yarn …………

    Reply
  2. Gorgeous! Can’t quite imagine having the patience for a fingering weight tunic right now though!

    Reply
  3. dclulu

     /  21 July 2014

    This is really beautiful! I wonder if you’d consider writing up the pattern.

    Reply
    • Maybe… :)
      My difficulty is writing a standard pattern which can be used by other people; I tend to make up a lot of things while still knitting, and adjusting for fit.

      Reply

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